How Much Does It Cost to Pressure Wash and Power Wash a House?

Allie Ogletree
Written by Allie Ogletree
Updated August 2, 2022
Nice home exterior with clean siding
Photo: hikesterson / iStock / Getty Images

The typical cost range to pressure wash a house is $100 to $650

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Pressure washing your home is one of the easiest ways to make it look good as new. How much you’ll pay for pressure washing will depend on what project you’re planning. Small areas like a driveway or patio can cost as little as $100, but you might pay $650 or more to pressure wash your entire home. If you opt for power washing, the cost will go up a little more.

Pressure Washing vs. Power Washing

Though both pressure washing and power washing are terms used interchangeably, there are differences between the two, both in terms of method and cost. Overall, pressure washing is cheaper and costs anywhere from $100 to $750, whereas power washing costs anywhere from $250 to $400 on average. 

Pressure washing utilizes cold high-pressure water to do the job, while power washing uses heated high-pressure water. Since power washing uses heated water, it requires more expensive equipment, meaning you’ll pay more for power washing. However, you get what you pay for in this case—especially if you have tough dirt and stains you want to quickly remove from concrete surfaces or other durable materials.

Pressure Washing Cost Breakdown

You can break down the costs associated with pressure washing a home into equipment and labor.

Project Type

Pressure washing typically costs $0.10 to $0.50 per square foot, depending on what part of your property you’re cleaning. Flat, easily accessible surfaces like driveways and patios take less effort. However, their relatively small size means that a technician is spending little time at your home, despite having to pay for gas, insurance, and all other overhead costs. For this reason, you’ll find that pressure washing costs less per square foot when you give a professional more to do.

Project Size:

The larger your home, the more water, time, and labor required to pressure the surface.

Home SizeCost Range
1500 sq ft$150 – $750
2000 sq ft$200 – $1,000
2500 sq ft$250 – $1,250

Project complexity

Pressure washing prices increase when a technician has to spend more time or effort on your project. Examples of issues that can up your costs include grime buildup (requires cleaning agents), hard-to-access areas (requires more time), and larger, multi-story homes (requires more equipment).

If your home has particularly stubborn grime or a buildup of grease (particularly on the driveway), it may make more sense to power wash your home. This machine does a more effective job of breaking up stains, but it does also generally come with a higher price tag.

Location

Where you live plays a big role in how much you’ll pay to pressure wash your home. Here are some cost ranges and average project costs throughout the United States.

LocationCost RangeAverage Cost
New York$260–$520$375
Portland, ME$325–$560$420
Chicago$245–$450$345
Kansas City$215–$445$319
Dallas$165–$375$270
Phoenix$120–$270$190
Denver$150–$355$250
Sacramento, CA$180–$425$298
Portland, OR$250–$565$405

Equipment and Overhead

When you hire a professional, you can rest assured that they won’t arrive at your home with a pressure washer that they picked up off the shelf at the local big box store. 

Experts use professional-grade products that are faster and stronger than those most commonly made available to consumers. The cost of this premium equipment—and other operational costs like licensing, insurance, paperwork, and travel costs—are usually factored into the flat-rate trip fee that most professionals work into their estimates.

Labor

Pressure washing professionals typically charge $25 to $100 per hour for their services. Simpler jobs like driveway or fence cleaning will end up on the lower end of the scale, while more complex projects will cost more. Expect to pay more for jobs that require climbing (such as two-story homes or roofs), as well as those that involve accessing hard-to-reach areas.

Power Washing Cost Breakdown

Power washing costs anywhere from $0.15 to $0.75 per square foot, making it slightly costlier than pressure washing. However, you’ll find that most costs are similar because the machine, method for washing, and optional cleaners are identical in both options. 

Only the machine costs more because it produces heat in a boiler compartment before releasing the liquid. For this reason, labor, location, and project type follow a similar trend regardless of whether you choose power washing or pressure washing.

How Much Does It Cost to Pressure Wash and Power Wash by Project Type?

When talking about pressure washing a home, you might not always be referring to the house itself. Several other areas on your property could benefit from a thorough cleaning. Here are examples of the costs to pressure wash and power wash various parts of your home.

ProjectPressure Washing Average CostPower Washing Average Cost
Driveway$100 – $250$150 – $350
Patio$100 – $200$100 – $250
Fence$150 – $300$150 – $350
Gutters$50 – $150$50 – $300
Roof$450 – $700$450 – $700
Siding$150 – $1,400$150 – $1,400
One-story House$150 – $750$150 – $750
Two-story House$400 – $1,400$400 – $1,400
Three-story House$700 – $1,800$700 – $1,800

Driveway

Driveways are one of the most popular choices for pressure washing because they tend to accumulate grime faster due to lots of car and foot traffic. For pressure washing, you’ll pay $0.20 to $0.40 per square foot to clean a driveway. This translates to $100 to $500, or an average of $100 to $250, depending on the size of your driveway and the amount of work it takes. Driveways with lots of motor oil accumulation will require a cleaning solution and more labor.

You’ll pay around $150 to $350 on average to power wash your driveway in comparison.

Patio

To have a professional pressure wash a patio or deck, you’ll pay $100 to $200. Costs vary depending on the size of the patio and the ease of access. If a technician has to deal with stairs or obstructions, you’ll pay more for the added time and effort.

Power washing a patio costs between $100 and $250 on average, depending on the square feet and extent of the dirt and grime.

Fence

Pressure washing technicians usually charge $150 to $300 for fencing. Your price will depend on the length of the fence and its material type. Wood fences typically take longer (and thus cost more) because pros have to use less pressure to avoid damaging the wood.

Power washing a fence will cost slightly more, falling anywhere between $150 and $350 on average.

Gutters

You’ll pay $0.50 to $1.50 per foot for a tech to pressure wash your gutters, so a single-story house typically costs from $50 to $150. If you have a taller home, your technician will require a ladder or a bucket truck to reach the gutters, which will add to the cost of your project.

The cost to power wash gutters is anywhere from $50 to $300 on average, with two-story homes falling towards the higher end of the price range.

Roof

professional roof washer power washing
Photo: Marina Lohrbach / iStock / Getty Images

The cost to pressure clean a roof is typically higher than other types of projects. You’ll pay $0.50 to $1.00 per square foot, mostly due to the difficulty—it’s harder to get equipment on the roof and then navigate the sloped terrain. Expect to pay somewhere between $450 and $700 to pressure wash or power wash your roof, with power washing falling towards the higher end of the price range and pressure washing falling towards the lower end of the price range.

Siding Only

Many homeowners find that just pressure washing the siding of their home can greatly impact the building’s overall look. For this simpler project, you’ll pay anywhere from $150 to $1,400 on average, though this price can go upwards of $2,500 for large power washing projects, depending on how much siding there is to clean.

One-story house

Power washing or pressure washing an entire one-story home typically costs $150 to $750. The biggest factors influencing the cost include your location, the size of your house, and the difficulty of reaching every area of your home. Smaller homes may get away with as little as $75 for a pressure washing, while larger one-story homes using a power washer may go up to $1,000.

Two-story house

Most professional pressure washers and power washers can wash the exterior of a two-story home without needing extra equipment. As such, you’ll usually pay $400 to $1,400 to have either type of washing conducted, with costs largely dependent on the size of your home and the difficulty of the project. Anticipate spending toward the higher end of that range for power washer services.

Three-story house

The top of a three-story home will probably be beyond the reach of most pressure washers and power washers, even the professional-grade ones that technicians use. This means that the pro who comes to your home will most likely need a ladder, scissor lift, or even bucket truck to complete your project. The typical cost of pressure washing or power washing a three-story home is $700 to $1,800, but that price could go up based on project difficulty.

How Much Does It Cost to Pressure Wash or Power Wash a House Yourself?

professional power washes a fancy California home
Photo: Jodi Jacobson / E+ / Getty Images

When you take on the job of pressure washing or power washing a house yourself, you’ll save on labor costs, which could translate to $25 to $100 per hour. However, you’ll need to pay to rent or purchase equipment.

Rental Costs

If you rent a pressure cleaner, you can expect to pay $35 to $175 per day. Depending on your experience level and available time, you can finish most cleaning projects in a day. For larger jobs, such as pressure washing a home's exterior, you might spend more than a day, especially if you have hard-to-access areas or two or more stories.

Purchase Costs

Buying a pressure cleaner is another option, but you may pay quite a bit upfront. Most pressure washers cost $100 to $1,000 but remember that cheaper, entry-level models aren’t designed to hold up to long-term, repeated use. If you plan to use your pressure washer regularly, you’ll want one that lasts.

DIY vs. Hiring a Pro

Pressure washing is a relatively easy job, but it does have its risks and dangers. When pressure washing, it’s important to understand the capabilities of your machine and the limits of the materials you’re washing. For example, wood is softer than concrete, so you won’t use as much pressure to clean it. Otherwise, you may risk damaging the wood and racking up additional repair fees.

Pressure washers can also be dangerous when used incorrectly or carelessly. The greatest risk comes from accidental laceration, which might happen when the extremely strong spray from a pressure washer passes over your skin.

Because of these risks, it’s a good idea to hire a local pressure washing professional. They’ll have the training and personal safety equipment to do the best job.

FAQs

What should I think about when hiring a pressure washing professional?

When hiring someone to pressure wash your home, you should always look for a company that’s bonded, licensed, and insured. Working with an unlicensed or uninsured company can spell disaster if something goes wrong. Beyond that, look for companies with good reputations, and be sure to ask for a written estimate that details all the costs for your project.

Should I pressure wash the house myself or hire a professional?

Pressure washing seems like a straightforward activity—after all, you just point and shoot, right? But it can actually take quite a bit of effort and know-how, and if you’re not careful, you can seriously hurt yourself. 

If you’re debating whether you should hire a professional or pressure wash your home yourself, consider that the cost of renting a machine for a weekend could be more than just hiring a pro in the first place.

How long does pressure washing take?

It’ll take around 30 minutes to three hours to pressure wash a home, depending on its size. You’ll also need to account for equipment set up and take down, which usually takes about 30 minutes.

What’s the difference between power washing and pressure washing?

The main difference between pressure washing vs. power washing is the temperature of the water. Power washing uses hot water, whereas pressure washing does not. Power washing also uses more water and has a less forceful water stream. You can use a cleaning solution with both methods.

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